September 1, 2008

To be eligible for the subsidy, an employee must be involuntarily terminated between September 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. An employee involuntarily terminated before September 1, 2008, is not eligible for the subsidy, even if the employee’s COBRA coverage did not start until after September 1.

Example

An employee was laid off on June 15, 2008, but received severance pay, including health insurance benefits, through December 31, 2008. The employee is not eligible for the subsidy in March 2009. It is the date of involuntary termination that controls–in this case June 15, 2008.

February 17, 2009

This is the date the ARRA became law. Persons eligible for COBRA after September 1, 2008 and prior to February 17, 2008, who do not have it (even if they had it and dropped it), may elect COBRA during an extended enrollment period.

March 1, 2009

The first day of subsidy for most persons who had COBRA continuation coverage in effect on February 17, 2009.

December 31, 2009

This is the last day that an employee can be involuntarily terminated and still be eligible for the COBRA subsidy, unless the subsidy is extended by Congress.

September 30, 2010

The COBRA subsidy runs for nine months only, unless Congress extends the period of subsidy. Consequently, an employee who was involuntarily terminated on December 31, 2009 would be eligible for the COBRA subsidy through September 30, 2010.

Example

On December 15, 2009, an employee is involuntarily terminated and elects COBRA coverage that day. She will receive the subsidy for 9 months, until the earlier of August 15, 2010, or until she becomes eligible for other group health plan coverage or Medicare.